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Thursday, July 13, 2006

Border Bungles!


One pic says it all....AUUUUGHHHHH!!!! Can we say "Major Flare-age of Border"??

I'm having to do folded over, hand stitched tucks to ease in the fullness. Whaaaa! This quilt belongs to a customer. They are 1930's and 40's fabrics, including some suit weight knits!

Other things I've learned....baptist fans do not ease in atrocities as much as meandering can. Warm & Natural doesn't have enough loft to suck in fullness either, it is like quilting through cardboard, and unless your quilt is PERFECTLY flat, you can't ease anything in with it either. And what I really hate is trying to find the nicest way to tell the piecer, who is a quilt shop owner (and sweet as can be!) how to avoid these pitfalls.

This is my whine for the day! :c)

Bonnie

16 comments:

Gail said...

Wow, that is a flare-out. I'm sure you'll find a diplomatic way to deal with the customer. Could you volunteer to do a one class presentation at the store regarding what to give to/expect from a longarm quilter. You covered some good things on your website,maybe some of that stuff with slides of things like this (not using one she would recognize, of course). And maybe a few tips on how to correct these mistakes before the top goes to the quilter. Personally, I'd love some good demos on how to square up a top and such. I can always learn something new, and heaven knows I can always stand to improve!

Ms. Jan said...

Ouch! If anyone can fix it, you can!

Screen Door said...

You've got to be the Florence Nightingale of quilts. I've always been so scared to send quilts to long arm quilters - afraid of so many imperfections. I've seen pics of work, show us a picture of how you saved this quilt, Lessons for all of us to learn.

Melanie

joyce said...

Gail's idea of lessons is a good one. I have never sent anything to a longarm quilter so have had to deal with all the imperfections myself. THat is quite a flare though. I'm wondering just how you will fix it.

McIrish Annie said...

WOW, that is a problem. I, too would love to hear your advice on this. i have sent quilts to a longarm quilter but i made sure it was super square before sending it. I probably wouldn't have been so precise if I was quilting it.! LOL

sending cheese to go with your whine!! hope the rest of your day is better.

Laura said...

Wow, I feel sorry for you having to deal with that!

Linda C. said...

That's a perfect example for teaching the reason one measures the borders and cuts them to size before sewing them to the quilt top. Looks like the classic "cut a long strip and slap it on there" technique.

Good luck with breaking it to her gently!

quiltpixie said...

What a mess! The once or twice I've had huge flares like that I've actually sliced and flattened the flare, the probelm is there's then this seam in the border... doesn't work so well if its a customer's quilt.... hummmm good luck :-)

Karen said...

Wowwww, you could sail a boat on those waves. What a problem. Can you email this photo to her? Quiltpixie's idea seems good, to cut and slice. I'm sitting here trying to remember how you avoid wavy borders. I know you need to decide on border measurement and ease it in to fit, not just sew it on and whatever length it uses up along the seam is fine, no no it's not fine!! And grain is important, yes? Something about grain....

Joanne said...

Wow -- that's all I can say!

Gina Halladay said...

I feel your pain...I am a long-armer too and recently had to do a cosmetic tuck on a vintage quilt with "floppy" borders. It turned out fine and was much better than sitting in a cedar chest for another30 years! Nice blog. I write on online column on quilting at www.QuiltersBuzz.com check it out when you have a minute!

Sandra said...

Wow! If you didn't have a headache before, I bet you've got one now LOL. That's a flare and a half if ever I saw one! I'm thinking cut and sew the border. All the best with this one!

Susan said...

Now I remember why the quilting business wasn't always fun! Thanks for the reminder. I'll whine less. =)

Darcie said...

Here I come with my cheese to add to your whine, Bonnie!!! You know what's also even worse than this major flare-age? Knowing that it probably will not be the last quilt in the world to have major flare-age!

I really feel for you, Bonnie. And unless *those flare-age causing quilters* have ever tried to machine quilt one of these babies...they probably look at it like it's not a big deal. I've had to tell clients about the whole deal...trying very hard to be PC and kind and compassionate...and then they've said "Yeah...but I knew you could quilt it anyway." WHAT?!

You will add some sort of PITA charge, correct? Bonnie? Be strong now! ;-) It doesn't get rid of the problem...but it can help with the wine! ;-) Err...umm...whine!

Lily said...

Am still chuckling at being able to sail on those waves.

COuld you not try the old positive feedback sandwich? EG "Dear X. Great quilt. It's just beautiful. Love the fabrics you've chosen. There's a slight problem with one of the borders that should be a snap to fix. I've got a couple of ways we can proceed. Here are the options. A B and C. Which option do you like best?" etc, etc.

Puts the decision back in her hands without insulting her!!

Good luck Bonnie :)

Dawn said...

Wow, that is major flare-up. The good is I know you'll make it work out somehow - the bad - you have to do something! This and trying to deal with other people and what they expect as opposed to what I expect and can do is one big reason I don't quilt/piece for other people when they ask! It makes me way to nervous!